DIN-TERMinologie online

Within weeks of the online launch of DIN TERM online enabling users to search for terms in three languages free of charge, DIN has now introduced a further language-based online service, the new DIN-TERMinology Portal giving registered users full access to the “DIN-TERM” terminology database.

16-11-2012 DIN, the German Institute for Standardization has extended its range of online services with the introduction of its search tool DIN-TERM online in October and the DIN-TERMinology Portal in November. Both provide free access to the terms contained in the “DIN-TERM” terminology database in German, with English and French equivalents wherever available. The portal will prove useful to technical writers, editors and translations, internationally active organizations, as well as to national and international experts and institutions involved in laying down specifications. The database is updated on a regular basis.

DIN-TERM online (www.din.de/sce/dinterm-en) provides access to over 170,000 terms and definitions taken from currently valid German standards. Many are taken from DIN Standards based on European and International Standards.

The DIN-TERMinology Portal can be found at www.din-term.de. Registered users not only find terms and their translations from currently valid standards plus the associated definitions, notes, examples, etc., they also have access to terms and definitions from draft standards and specifications together with details of the source document from which the term was taken. Users can either search for a specific term, look through the whole database, or choose to see all the entries for an individual standards committee, listed alphabetically.

Source: www.din.de – DIN-TERMinologie

Contact

Terminologiestelle DIN-TERMKONZEPT im DIN
Annette Preissner
Am DIN-Platz
Burggrafenstr. 6
10787 Berlin

DIN-TERMinologie online

Nur wenige Wochen nach dem Online-Gang der kostenfreien Benennungssuche DIN-TERM online hat das DIN sein terminologisches Online-Angebot heute um einen weiteren Dienst ergänzt. Im registrierungspflichtigen DIN-TERMinologieportal stehen nunmehr sämtliche Inhalte der Terminologiedatenbank DIN-TERM des DIN für jedermann kostenfrei zur Verfügung.

16-11-2012 – Das Internetangebot des DIN Deutsches Institut für Normung e. V. ist im Oktober um die kostenfreie Benennungssuche DIN-TERM online und im November um das ebenfalls kostenfreie DIN-TERMinologieportal erweitert worden. Ziel beider Anwendungen ist es, den in der Terminologiedatenbank DIN-TERM dokumentierten terminologischen Wissensschatz des DIN öffentlich in den Sprachen Deutsch, Englisch und Französisch zugänglich zu machen. Das neue Angebot bietet zum Beispiel technischen Autoren, Redakteuren und Übersetzern, international tätigen Unternehmen, nationalen und internationalen Experten und Institutionen, die sich mit dem Erstellen von technischen Regeln befassen, Hilfestellung bei der Wahl des richtigen Wortes. Der beiden Anwendungen zugrunde liegende Begriffsbestand wird dabei laufend aktualisiert.

Der neue Service DIN-TERM online, der unter http://www.din.de/sc/dinterm-de einzusehen ist, stellt rund 170.000 Begriffsfestlegungen aus gültigen Normen und ihren europäischen und internationalen Paralleldokumenten bereit. Die Anwendung gibt beispielsweise Antworten auf die Fragen, was “Hohlisolator” auf Französisch oder “whip hose” auf Deutsch heißt.

Das registrierungspflichtige DIN-TERMinologieportal ist unter www.din-term.de erreichbar. Es bietet neben den genormten Benennungen aus gültigen Normen und ihren genormten Übersetzungen zusätzlich die zugehörigen Definitionen, Anmerkungen, Beispiele etc. und darüber hinaus auch Begriffsfestlegungen aus Norm-Entwürfen und Spezifikationen einschließlich der Angabe des jeweiligen Quelldokuments. Hier kann entweder gezielt nach Benennungen gesucht oder aber der komplette Begriffsbestand bzw. auch nur der eines einzelnen Normungsgremiums alphabetisch nach Benennungen sortiert eingesehen werden.

Quelle: http://www.din.de – DIN-TERMinologie online

Kontakt

Terminologiestelle DIN-TERMKONZEPT im DIN
Annette Preissner
Am DIN-Platz
Burggrafenstr. 6
10787 Berlin

International IT Regulations and Compliance. Quality Standards in the Pharmaceutical and Regulated Industries

Research and Markets has announced the addition of John Wiley and Sons Ltd’s new report International IT Regulations and Compliance. Quality Standards in the Pharmaceutical and Regulated Industries to their offering.

After taking part in an EU Leonardo da Vinci project to create a complete curriculum for a Master’s degree in IT Validation, Siri H. Segalstad decided to write this book as she realised there was a need for a comprehensive book that rings together current thinking on the implementation of standards and regulations in relation to IT for a wide variety of industries.

This text allows the readers to acquire not only knowledge but also understanding of quality thinking and to apply this knowledge. It will allow them to use the Quality Management System (QMS) as a tool for further development in their organization and to assess QMS from other companies during a supplier audit.

This book will enable the user to understand the process of validation, how to divide validation into manageable pieces, and what is included in the validation for different types of systems.

Topics covered include:

- Quality standards
– Regulatory requirements for IT systems
– Quality Management Systems-QMS
– Organization for an IT system
– Legal implications of an IT system
– Advanced quality management systems
– Validation process and validation techniques
– Validation of IT systems
– Risk assessment and risk management
– Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) and Building Management Systems (BMS)

This comprehensive text will be useful to those working with quality assurance and validation of IT systems and in regulated industries, regardless of which standards they are using.
For more information visit Research and Markets

Source: John Wiley and Sons Ltd
Business Wire 
Source: Pharmiweb.com

New pharmacovigilance legislation comes into operation

Better protection of public health through strengthened EU system for medicines safety

02/07/2012 – The European Medicines Agency (EMA) welcomes the start of new European Union (EU) legislation on pharmacovigilance. This new piece of legislation aims to promote and protect public health by strengthening the existing Europe-wide system for monitoring the safety and benefit-risk balance of medicines.

“The progress made in healthcare would not have been possible without medicines and the research and development community behind them. But we need smart regulation for the system to be able to continue to deliver safe and effective medicines,” said the Agency’s Executive Director, Guido Rasi.

“The new pharmacovigilance legislation will help us to make the system more robust for public health and more transparent. It gives regulators a range of new or improved tools to ensure that patients are not exposed to unnecessary risks when taking medicines. It also increases the efficiency of medicines regulation for the benefit of all stakeholders.”

The new legislation was proposed by the European Commission in 2008 and adopted by the European Parliament and the Member States in December 2010. Highlights of the new legislation include:

  • establishment of a new scientific committee, the Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC);
  • clarification of the roles and responsibilities of all actors involved in the monitoring of the safety and efficacy of medicines in Europe and strengthened coordination, leading to more robust and rapid EU decision-making;
  • engagement of patients and healthcare professionals in the regulatory process, including direct consumer reporting of suspected adverse drug events;
  • improved collection of key information on medicines, e.g. through risk-proportionate, mandatory post-authorisation safety and efficacy studies;
  • more transparency and better communication, including publication of agendas and minutes of the PRAC and the possibility to hold public hearings.

The Agency is ready for the first meeting of the PRAC on 19 and 20 July 2012. All Member States have nominated their members. The European Commission has appointed six independent scientific experts who will also serve as members. The nomination of PRAC members representing patients and healthcare professionals will follow a new public call for expressions of interest.

Information about the roles and the functioning of the PRAC has been published today and can be found on the Agency’s website, together with more information about the new pharmacovigilance legislation.

Notes
1. This press release, together with all related documents, is available on the Agency’s website.
2. More information on the new pharmacovigilance legislation is available here.
3. The status report ‘Countdown to July 2012: the Establishment and Functioning of the PRAC’ is available on the Agency’s website.
4. The new pharmacovigilance legislation is comprised of Directive 2010/84/EU and Regulation (EU) No 1235/2010.
5. More information on the work of the European Medicines Agency can be found on its website

European Medicines Agency publishes new versions of controlled vocabularies

The European Medicines Agency publishes new versions of controlled vocabularies used to comply with Article 57 (2) requirements on submission of information on medicines

The European Medicines Agency has published a set of updated versions of Extended EudraVigilance product report message (XEVMPD) controlled vocabularies. These vocabularies support marketing authorisation holder compliance with Article 57(2) of the 2010 pharmacovigilance legislation, which requires marketing-authorisation holders to submit information to the Agency electronically on all medicines for human use authorised in the European Union by 2 July 2012.

The controlled vocabularies will be updated regularly to improve the standardisation of the terminology used in the electronic submission of medicinal product information to the Agency.

A marketing-authorisation holder that has already submitted medicine information to the Agency using the previous version of the controlled vocabularies is not required to resubmit this information. Marketing-authorisation holders are required to use the latest versions of the controlled vocabularies for submissions of medicine information as soon as they are published on the Agency’s website.

The updated controlled vocabularies are available on the EMA website

Medizinische Übersetzer – keine Ausnahmen von der Regel

Armbruster, Siegfried (2011). Medizinische Übersetzer – keine Ausnahmen von der Regel  Veröffentlicht in: BW polyglott, November 2011, Ausgabe 2, S. 20

Die Sicht einer kleinen, hochspezialisierten Übersetzungsagentur

Pharma- und Medizintechnikunternehmen sind in besonderem Maße regulatorischen Vorga­ben unterworfen. Projekt-Verzögerungen oder Übersetzungsfehler können schwerwiegende und kostspielige Konsequenzen haben. Deshalb sind Unternehmen aus den GxP-Branchen, die die Richtlinien für „gute Arbeitspraxis” befolgen (müssen), – Großunternehmen ebenso wie zerti­fizierte Übersetzungsagenturen – auf der Suche nach der „eierlegenden Wollmilchsau” der Über­setzungsbranche – dem medizinischen Fachüber­setzer.

Idealerweise sollten medizinische Übersetzer linguistische Kompetenz, medizinisches, phar­makologisches und technisches Fachwissen, Kenntnisse der relevanten regulatorischen Ver­ordnungen, Vorschriften und Standards sowie Kenntnisse der gängigen CAT-Tools (CAT = Com­puter assisted translation) etc. besitzen, und nach ISO 9001 und EN 15038 zertifiziert sein.

Linguistische Kompetenz

Über die erforderlichen linguistischen Kompeten­zen eines Übersetzers lässt sich diskutieren, aber nach EN 15038 muss mindestens eine der folgen­den Voraussetzungen erfüllt sein:

  • Formale höhere Übersetzungsausbildung
  • Vergleichbare Ausbildung in einem anderen Fachbereich mit mindestens zwei Jahren doku­mentierter Übersetzungserfahrung
  • Mindestens fünf Jahre dokumentierte professi­onelle Übersetzungserfahrung

In EN 15038 sind auch andere Kompetenzen fest­gelegt, wie sprachliche und textliche Kompetenz in der Ausgangs- und Zielsprache, die kontinuier­liche berufliche Weiterbildung oder die Kompe­tenzen auf dem Gebiet der Recherche.

Fachkompetenz

Wie bei den medizinischen Berufen gibt es auch bei medizinischen Übersetzern unterschiedliche Spezialisierungen. Wer sich auf die Übersetzung von Beipackzetteln und Fachinformationen kon­zentriert, ist nicht unbedingt dafür geeignet, eine Benutzeroberfläche für ein Bildarchivierungs­und Kommunikationssystem zu lokalisieren, und Spezialisten für klinische Fragebögen kennen sich nicht notwendigerweise mit chirurgischen Instrumenten aus. Ich behaupte nicht, dass man ohne medizinische Ausbildung keine guten me­dizinischen Übersetzungen erstellen kann. Wer aber auf Terminologie-Seiten im Internet im Kon­text eines orthopädischen Textes über Wirbel­säulenchirurgie zum Beispiel den englischen Be­griff „cervical” dem Gebärmutterhals zuordnet oder in einer Übersetzung schreibt „Bei Diabe­tikern besteht das primäre Behandlungsziel da­rin, möglichst niedrige Blutzuckerwerte zu er­zielen”, zeigt, dass ihm jegliches Verständnis für den Inhalt des Ausgangstextes fehlt. Dies könnte im zweiten genannten Beispiel erhebliche Kon­sequenzen nach sich ziehen, sprich Unterzucke­rung mit nachfolgendem Zuckerschock bis hin zum Tode. Eine regelmäßige Weiterbildung und fundierte Recherchekenntnisse sind deshalb un­abdingbar, um sich das entsprechende Fachwis­sen anzueignen bzw. zu erhalten.

Als hochspezialisierte Übersetzungsagentur für Medizin sind wir immer bestrebt, „den” Spe­zialisten zu finden, und Übersetzer, die in ihrem Profil angeben, dass sie in Recht, Finanzen, Mar­keting, Tourismus und Medizin spezialisiert sind, kommen gar nicht erst in die engere Auswahl.

Regulatorische Kenntnisse

Im regulatorischen Bereich haben Übersetzer wie Übersetzungsagenturen noch Nachholbedarf. Viele Normen und Richtlinien schreiben den ge­nauen Wortlaut für Übersetzungen vor, und Dis­kussionen, ob eine andere Übersetzung besser klingt als der vorgeschriebene Wortlaut, sind un­nötig. Der Kunde muss das übersetzte Dokument womöglich bei einer Zulassungsbehörde einrei­chen und jede Abweichung vom vorgeschriebe­nen Wortlaut kann zur Ablehnung führen und er­hebliche Kosten verursachen.

Regulatorische Vorgaben können sich ändern. So wurden zum Beispiel kürzlich die Standard­texte für Medikamentenbeipackzettel geändert. Übersetzer, die sich nicht regelmäßig auf der Website der Europäischen Arzneimittelbehörde (www.ema.europa.eu) über Änderungen infor­mieren, laufen Gefahr, „falsche” Übersetzungen zu liefern. Dies ist nur ein Beispiel für regulato­rische Vorgaben. Die US-Norm ASTM 2503-05 schreibt unter anderem vor, dass Produkte, die nur unter bestimmten Bedingungen in MRT-Um-gebungen (MRT = Magnetresonanztomographie) betrieben werden können, mit „MR conditional” zu kennzeichnen sind. Wer das nicht weiß (oder recherchiert), wird kaum die Übersetzung „Be­dingt MR-sicher” verwenden, die im Entwurf der DIN 6877-1:2007-12 (Magnetresonanzeinrichtun­gen für die Anwendung am Menschen) vorge­schrieben ist.

CAT-Tools

Übersetzungskosten zu senken, wird oft als der wichtigste Grund für die Verwendung von CAT-Tools genannt. Gerade in den regulierten Bran­chen ist die Konsistenz der Übersetzungen jedoch viel wichtiger. In einem Projekt für ein Pharma­unternehmen fanden wir zum Beispiel bei einem Medikament, das in sechs verschiedenen Konzen­trationen zugelassen ist, bis zu vier verschiedene Übersetzungen für die gleichen Ausgangssätze. Für die Umstellung der Dokumentation von ei­nem dokumentenbasierten System auf ein Con­tent-Management-System müssen diese Über­setzungen konsolidiert werden. Dies verursacht nicht nur einen erheblichen Aufwand bei der Da­tenkonvertierung; die Dokumente der Medika­mente, die von den Änderungen betroffen sind, müssen in ihrer geänderten Form auch von den Zulassungsbehörden genehmigt werden. Mit kun­denspezifischen Translation-Memory-Systemen können CAT-Tools dieses Problem minimieren und dadurch Kosten einsparen, die die Kosten für die Übersetzung um ein Vielfaches übertreffen.

Rollen und Aufgaben

Um als medizinischer Übersetzer oder Überset­zungsagentur mit Schwerpunkt Medizin im aktu­ellen Umfeld erfolgreich zu sein, müssen wir uns vom klassischen Rollenverständnis des Überset­zers verabschieden.

Betrachten wir einmal die Übersetzung ei­nes medizinischen Fragebogens für eine klini­sche Studie (in der Ausgangssprache 482 Wor­te). Klar, werden viele denken, die Übersetzung kann ich in ein paar Stunden machen. Aber die­se Übersetzung ist nur ein Baustein im ganzen Ablauf der Lokalisierung des Fragebogens. Schon vor Projektbeginn wird in unserer Agentur je­der Satz und jeder Begriff in einer „Begriffsana­lyse” erläutert (2123 Worte). Anschließend wird der Fragebogen von zwei spezialisierten Über­setzern übersetzt. Ein Projektkoordinator beur­teilt die beiden Vorwärtsübersetzungen (Bewer­tung der Übersetzung) und erstellt daraus eine konsolidierte Übersetzung. In der Vorwärtsüber-setzungsanalyse (2586 Worte) begründet er für jedes Segment, warum er die eine oder andere Übersetzung bevorzugt oder eine dritte Überset­zung vorschlägt. Diese Version wird durch einen Rückübersetzer zurück in die Ausgangssprache übersetzt. Die Rückübersetzung wird dann vom Auftraggeber mit dem Ausgangstext verglichen und in Form einer Rückwärtsübersetzungsanaly-se (3235 Worte) mit dem Projektkoordinator dis­kutiert, um eventuelle Kontroversen aufzulösen. Die resultierende Übersetzung wird durch einen Mediziner kommentiert und mit dem Projektko­ordinator diskutiert (ärztlicher Prüfbericht, 7059 Worte). Diese Übersetzung wird in Interviews mit fünf Patienten validiert und die Ergebnisse im Pi­lotversuchsbericht (5298 Worte) dokumentiert und diskutiert. Nach Klärung aller Fragen wird sie vom Korrekturleser kontrolliert und die Änderun­gen werden im Änderungsprotokoll (826 Worte) begründet.

Um die endgültige übersetzte Version des Fra­gebogens (556 Worte) zu erstellen, wurden ohne die E-Mail-Kommunikation und einige kleinere Dokumente mitzuzählen, Dokumente mit einem Umfang von 21 127 Worten verfasst. An dem Pro­jekt, das zwei Monate in Anspruch nahm, waren ein Projektvorbereiter (ein Medical Writer), drei Übersetzer, ein Projektkoordinator (ein Überset­zer), ein Mediziner, ein Korrekturleser (ein Über­setzer) und ein Projektmanager des Auftragge­bers beteiligt.

Maschinelle Übersetzungen werden in diesem Arbeitsablauf noch lange keine entscheidende Rolle spielen. Den großen, nicht spezialisierten Übersetzungsbüros, die „perfect” auftreten oder die die Übersetzer mit Löwenanstrengungen in die Cloud zerren möchten, droht das gleiche Schick­sal wie den Vollsortimentern im Einzelhandel, ihre Zeit ist abgelaufen. Die Arbeitsabläufe in der viel gescholtenen und durch das Internet ermöglich­ten Globalisierung verschieben das Gleichgewicht in Richtung kleiner, hochspezialisierter Teams oder kleiner, hochspezialisierter Übersetzungs­agenturen, die den Kunden qualitativ hochwerti­ge Ergebnisse liefern. Daher ist es empfehlens­wert, sich kontinuierlich weiterzubilden, denn teamfähige Übersetzer mit entsprechenden Qua­lifikationen werden zunehmend gesucht.

Armbruster, Siegfried (2011). Medizinische Übersetzer – keine Ausnahmen von der Regel  In: BW polyglott, November 2011, Ausgabe 2, S. 20

GxP will be attending conhIT 2012

The GxP Team will be travelling to Berlin from April 23rd to April 26th to attend this year’s conhIT Trade Show, Europe’s largest and most important Healthcare IT professional event.

With four coordinated sections, the Industrial Fair, Congress, Academy and Networking Events, conhIT actively supports the dialogue between manufacturers, users, policymakers and science. Throughout the entire value-added chain conhIT 2012 shows how modern IT improves the quality of healthcare, as well as helping institutions to remain competitive.

Read here Daniel Bahr’s welcoming address,  German Health Federal Minister and patron of conhIT2012.

If you wish to meet up with us at this occasion, feel free to contact us at info@gxp-language-services.com!