Standing Out, or the Art of Becoming an Outstanding Translator

By Andrew Morris, Morristraduction
This article was originally posted on the Alexandria Project’s blog

Gummy Bear Stepping out of LineThere’s a fair amount of victim culture in our little world of translation, between the evil ghost of Machine Tourism hovering in the wings, the rapacious agencies, (oh and don’t get me started on the Big Guys), the constant lament about the crowded market place, and the ever-present refrain about how fees are being driven down.

My goodness, it’s carnage out there. So much so that it’s possible to throw your hands up and say “With things that bad, what can a translator possibly do to survive?” If you’re that way inclined, that is.

But I’m not that way inclined. And my answer to the question is simple. “Everything”.

When I started out I’d never heard of multi-language vendors, I wasn’t familiar with the term machine translation, and I certainly knew nothing about the lurking monsters and the clouds hanging over the industry, if some of the prophets of doom are to believed. I simply began by working on what I had to do, creating my own space, in a tiny village in rural France, and doing it as well as I could, and the rest gradually fell into place. And it’s not over yet…. I’m just getting into my stride.

The fact is that your life as a translator is in your hands, not anyone else’s and certainly not “the industry’s”. Realising this is about making the shift from victim to agent, from someone at the mercy of “market forces” to someone who decides that from now on, they are in control, and they will call the shots. It’s about understanding that your own professional world, with all its ups and downs, is nothing but your own creation.

Always assuming, of course, that you’re actually good at what you do, and that you haven’t missed your real vocation, somewhere along your journey, which was to become a trapeze artist, a concert cellist or a master baker of cupcakes.

So rather than trying to change the whole world, if you work on your own little patch of it and become the best translator you can be, showing yourself in the best possible light, and pushing yourself to grow, you will stand out. And that’s a promise. Not only that, you will thrive and watch your professional life begin to develop in ways you never even imagined…

How am I so sure of this? Because it’s exactly what happened to me in the five years since I first became a translator. And I’ve seen it mirrored in countless other colleagues since.

Now don’t get me wrong. Getting ahead and standing out from the crowd doesn’t mean trampling on other people. There’s room for everyone, all standing out from each other. It simply means finding your unique niche and letting your own individuality shine through.

So forget about who else is out there and what they’re up to: just work on yourself as a professional practitioner and the rest will follow. When your own vision is stronger than the other hectoring, doubting or complaining voices around, and when you do what inspires you, in a way that inspires you (or, as someone once said, ‘You tap-dance to work’), then you will soon see that people can’t wait to get what you have.

Of course along the way there will be challenges, obstacles and experiences that may initially appear as mistakes or even failures, but are in fact the most valuable feedback you can have. It’s part of the game. Who wants an easy life anyway?

My forthcoming webinar here on the Alexandria Project will identify 50 of the many practical and easily applicable ways in which you can stand out just by changing your own professional practice as a translator. But it starts with a shift in mindset, which is the basis for all that follows. We will begin by examining your values and deciding what you want, before going on to explore the best ways to brand and showcase your unique contribution, to attracting (and keeping) clients, the organisation of your working life and finally professional development and continued learning, but all connected to your fundamental understanding of yourself, your unique contribution to the world of translation and your vision.

Believe me, building a successful business takes enterprise and hard work, but it’s not rocket science. The secrets of success are in your hands. And in your mind. And the fact that you’ve read this far already shows you have the enthusiasm, commitment, drive and energy to start exploring ways of doing so, perhaps not for the first time. This commitment is something I share, and I’m looking forward to working with you towards making your mark. Join me on April 2nd and watch those opportunities unfold.

Andrew’s webinar: “50 ways to stand out as a translator” – April 2nd, 2014, 120 minutes (English).
For more information and to register: click here


AAndrew Morrisbout Andrew 
Andrew Morris has always been captivated by languages and the mysterious secret worlds they open up. This led him initially to a degree in modern languages at Oxford followed by a long career in language teaching and teacher training. But when in 2009 a series of chance(?) life events dictated it was time for a major change, a lightbulb flashed in his head… ‘Why not translation?’
It was a leap of faith… apart from a fascinating correspondence course for translators, his CV as a translator on the first day of his new life was a totally blank sheet. But with lots of hard work, some luck, a dollop of inspiration, a drop or two of perspiration and a hitherto undiscovered entrepreneurial spirit, things slowly began to fall into place. Now, fewer than five years later, he heads Morristraduction, a thriving boutique agency, working both with other agencies and major direct clients with a primary focus on culture and travel, and outsourcing to a regular team of 20 hand-picked colleagues. Business has grown by 475% in that time and the future looks bright…
But we never leave the past entirely behind, and Andrew’s constant search for new experience along with his background as a teacher and trainer have led him to reconnect with his training skills, offering webinars with the Alexandria Project as well as tailored one-to-one Skype coaching to translators at various levels of their careers…

Impressions and Trends 2013/2014

2013 - 2014(Click here for the German version)

Back in January 2012, I made the following forecasts for 2012:

  • A higher volume of work
  • An increase in rate levels for qualified translations
  • The social networks would grow in significance
  • Specialized tools are useful but the definition of exchange formats and workflows needs to be driven ahead
  • Machine translation has yet to fulfil its promises
  • Translation associations should be looking at extending their range of educational and CPD facilities
  • Representing the interests of the translation profession must be reinforced

The original article is here (available in German only).

For the year 2013, the topics remained more or less the same, as can be seen from the respective 2013 forecast (in English).

For the year 2014, the issues have shifted somewhat for us but in first place, we can still see:

- Order volumes and rates for qualified translations rising
- Social networks and Internet-based marketplaces for translation services
- Increasing specialized tools/interoperability of translation tools
- Machine Translation
- Looking ahead – 2014
- Specialization, CPD
- Diversification
- The market continues to separate itself
- Closing observations


Order volumes and rates for qualified translations rising

In this context, a study by an independent market research company for buyers of translation services is very interesting as an example. The summary of the report alone provides 3 paragraphs with exciting statements.

Statement 1 from the study by IBISWorld:

“Prices have risen moderately over the past three years, and are forecast to continue rising at a slightly slower rate through 2016. Price increases are due to a recent rise in demand for translation services stemming from increased globalization, rising immigrant populations and growing world trade values.”

In contrast to the opinion that is often expressed by many translators, the statement made here is that rates have risen in the last three years and will continue to do so over coming years. One reason cited for this is the increase in the volume of texts that need to be translated. The Common Sense Advisory reported back in June about this continued growth of the market: “The language services industry continues to grow, albeit slowly. LSPs: look up and smile. You are part of an industry that is worth US$34.778 billion and continues to grow at 5.13%, despite macroeconomic indicators telling a different story.” 

Statement 2 from the study by IBISWorld:

Buyers must pay the prevailing market price in order to purchase translation services, because there are no equivalent alternatives beyond employing a team of in-house translators. Also detrimental to buyer power is the level of specialization among translation services. There are far fewer suppliers capable of translating rare or highly technical language, making the acquisition of these services more expensive.

The second statement in the IBISWorld study contains some explosive material. It is not only pointed out that – apart from a team of in-house translators – there is no alternative to freelance translators (which simply means that machine translation is not considered to be a viable alternative), but the very clear statement is made that there are only few translators for rare languages ​​or specific technical subject areas, thus making the sourcing of these services more expensive. Whoever does not understand that as justification for further specialization by freelancers should perhaps look at the third statement in the study.

Statement 3 from the study by IBISWorld:

In general, however, the total number of translation services suppliers has increased considerably in the past three years, due in part to rising Internet usage. The majority of suppliers are independent, non-employing translators. The Internet has made it simpler for independent suppliers to find clients and to start their own businesses. The large number of competitors and low market share concentration among translation services providers help to moderate price increases and provide buyers with leverage when negotiating price.

Here it is quite clear that when it does not depend on specialized services, buyers of translation services can use a wide range of service providers to drive down rates in negotiations.

Social networks and Internet-based marketplaces for translation services

social networks, vintage sign

In this area, I unfortunately did not see only positive developments last year. The trend shows clearly that the previous translation platforms (Proz.com, Translatorscafe etc.) are losing more and more significance. Unfortunately however, cut-price platforms such as oDesk, Elance and whatever they are all called are expanding, and the bad thing here is that the impression is conveyed through these platforms that qualified translations are available for peanuts. It is also translators themselves here who shoot themselves in the foot by supporting these platforms.

On Facebook unfortunately, a strong fragmentation of the translator groups occurred. In addition to the clearly- defined groups that are dedicated to specific tasks (for example “Find a Translator” for jobs, “Translators helping Translators” for terminological assistance and “Glossarissimo” as a glossary collection), there are now countless groups for translators, so that it is virtually impossible to even come close to follow all (for German language translators for example, the group “Übersetzer/innen” can be recommended , while for English “Water Cooler” is certainly a recommendable group). It’s amazing how many good jobs are now placed via Facebook. Professional participation in the aforementioned groups is therefore certainly recommended.

LinkedIn and Xing are also increasingly developing into platforms on which LSPs are looking for freelancers and where LSPs and freelancers can establish contacts with end customers.

For those who use Twitter: the account  @Translate_Jobs is an aggregator to summarize  job offers from different sources. We also curate similar accounts to cover news from the translation profession with @Translate_News, while interesting blogs and events in the profession can be found at @Translate_Blogs and @TranslateEvents .

Increasing specialized tools/interoperability of translation tools

In this field too, much has been done during the last year. Both SDL Trados Studio and memoQ have endeavoured to improve the interoperability among what are the most popular products. Considerable progress has been made, and even with across, there are signs of the platform making progress. Overall, this is a very positive development because as LSPs or freelancers, we do not necessarily have to work with several tools  In our view, the hype about online TM tools and crowdsourcing tools seems to have eased somewhat, but that could also be because these tools may have found their place in another segment of the marketplace. I am still suspicious of tools with which I have no control over my TMs, or even tools where I have absolutely no TM.

Beyond TM tools however, there are further tools that play a crucial role in many market segments of the translation profession. Even if we do not love it, one of them, for example, is the processing of PDF files, and it is alarming how many translators have no understanding of the function and structure of PDF files. Anyone who experiences problems translating PDF files, regardless of which TM tool they are using, is at fault themselves. There are plenty of training opportunities (e.g. this webinar – in German) that explain how to edit PDF files.

Another technology that has unfortunately not been discussed enough is voice recognition software. With Dragon Naturally Speaking, real magic can be achieved and the productivity growth which can thus be achieved in some areas can even make those committed to MT /PEMT pendant green with envy.

Which of course brings us to one of the most controversial and sometimes almost hysterically-discussed topics in the translation profession: the alleged threat posed by MT.

Machine Translation

I cannot understand the almost frantic fear that many translators have with regard to MT. If you just look at what is happening in the market, you can recognize various interesting details. There are a few companies that dominate the market mainly through press releases and marketing activities, but let’s cut to the chase: who has ever seen a text translated by MT from Asia Online or KantanMT? Are they so good that you do not even notice, or indeed so bad that no one is buying the services. Why has Sayan, a large LSP, that has been relying on MT for years, actually just changed from Asia Online to KantanMT (see here). Did Asia Online not deliver the results that were so highly-praised by Sajan in 2011? Or is a price war between equal suppliers starting here?

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TriKonf Conference 2013

We dealt with the topic of MT in depth at Trikonf 2013, and Jutta Witzel summarized it beautifully in her MDÜ article (MDÜ 6/13).  In her opinion, “Trikonf strongly dispelled fears that machine translation could seriously endanger the work of human translators”. In his keynote speech, Prof. Philip Koehn really clearly pointed out just where MT can be useful and where not. One of his key messages was: “A machine translation system will never reach the point where it can replace the human translator”.

Unfortunately, many translators often forget that most of the tools with which we work today such as Trados Studio, MemoQ, Wordfast, OmegaT, DéjaVu or across, are based upon the early work of MT pioneers. TMs, AutoSuggest Sub-segment Matching, AutoAssemble etc. are all features that come from the MT area.

Prpf. Philipp Koehn at TriKonf 2013

Prof. Philipp Koehn delivering his keynote speech at TriKonf 2013

Professor Koehn therefore sees the need to help translators in their work. Two projects for that have already been started: Casmacat and Matecat. It is worthwhile finding out about it and maybe even participating in the activity.

My belief is – and remains – that MT and MT functionality are best left in the hands of translators, which is where they will also work best.

Looking ahead – 2014

Trends 2014

Specialization, CPD

Webinar Concept, education

The word is going around and analysts are proving it with numbers: Specialization is a way with which larger volumes of orders, higher rates and better profits can be achieved and there is not much to add to that. The route to specialization is no walk in the park. In addition to the professional training offered by the professional societies (e.g. BDÜ, ITI, ATA), there are also “private” platforms that offer qualified further education. Apart from the large MOOCs platforms, such as Coursera, there are also small specialized suppliers who make specific offers available for the translation profession such as eCPD Webinars, and of course our own CPD platform “The Alexandria Library which we founded just a year ago. For 2014 we have quite a few plans for the library and will be extending the audience soon.

But apart from the professional training facilities for “established” translators, it becomes ever more important to directly approach the universities. It really cannot be true that students at so-called “renowned” translation schools and universities who have taken a course in medical translation have never heard of EMA- templates.  A little more reality and a little less translation science would not hurt here.

It should be expected that the private suppliers and probably also translation associations will try to close this gap. At best, this can of course be fixed by the universities which is why I would plead for

  • Universities to establish contact with more experienced translator colleagues and agencies, in order to have training adapted accordingly
  • More experienced translators attending universities

Diversification

One of the key-words in 2013 was certainly diversification which, depending on your philosophy, could be seen as hype or a trend (which also was surely stimulated by Nicole Y. Adams’ eminently-readable book “Diversification in The Language Industry”. To what extent diversification is in opposition to specialization or even supports it, is not always quite clear.  Thus medical writing, for example, would be the additional specialization of a medical translator in my opinion and at the same time a step towards diversification. In other diversification activities I can see some risks; for example those which are addressed in the Wikipedia article about product/market matrix.

The market continues to separate itself

Listening to experienced colleagues like Chris Durban who, by the way, has also written a very recommendable book, she describes two groups that she refers to as “Bulk” and “Premium” translators. I would rather describe these segments as translators who are part of a “Buyers Market” or “Sellers Market”. Both descriptions actually refer to very similar market segments.

The “Bulk/Buyers Market” segment is characterized by a significant downward pressure on prices, an oversupply of translators or by those who describe themselves as translators. I see this market segment as a major threat to the entire industry, since it provides potential customers with two negative impressions.

a) Translations can be had for peanuts
b) We so often get poor quality that it is probably not worth paying more because of what we have to invest in reviewing translations.

Translators in the “Premium/ Sellers Market” segment are hardly aware of the problems, because they are usually fully booked and achieve a decent turnover. You often see them at conferences, training events and other professional events.

Jerzy Czopik, a colleague whom I hold in great esteem, regularly makes the point when mention is made of the Bulk/Buyers market segment: “We unfortunately have no contact with the people in this segment. They are not members of the professional translation associations, they do not participate in training events and often just muddle through on their own.” He’s right, and I also have no idea how this could be changed. Of course, it would be important specifically for these translators to take part in continued training and to network and they would benefit most from it. But that said, it is just as important for the translation profession itself to take care of these translators, otherwise they could cause more long-term damage there than all current and future MT solutions put together.


Closing observations

Fotolia_58454679_XS_copyright

What has changed in 2013? Not that much really. Unfortunately, the expected upward hike in the translation profession has not taken place and there has been a lot of whingeing and bitching. Rather than rousing itself and doing something positive, the profession just fragmented further. No, it does not help to call oneself “extraordinary”, to be “proud to work as a translator”, to suggest that people should “love their translator” or to subscribe to even more pointless opinions. And no, it also does not help to constantly rant against MT and evil agencies. The only recipe that will help the profession in the long run is:

  • to become a member of one of the established professional associations of translators and participate in order to strengthen them.
  • training/specialization/professionalization
  • to say no to jobs that are poorly paid or which are outside of the area in which you are experienced
  • to support beginners and students so that they can grow into the profession without becoming victims to any of the hyenas and vultures that abound there.

In this sense, I wish you every success in 2014, and see you at the FIT XXth World Congress in Berlin in August or MedTranslate in Freiburg.

 Thank you Chris Irwin for the English translation!

Siemens enters into master agreement with Pfizer for companion diagnostics

SiemensToday, Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc. announces that it has entered into a master collaboration agreement with Pfizer Inc. to design, develop and commercialize diagnostic tests for therapeutic products across Pfizer’s pipeline. Under the agreement, Siemens will be one of Pfizer’s collaboration partners to develop and provide in vitro diagnostic tests for use in clinical studies and, potentially, eventual global commercialization with Pfizer products.

The partnership will leverage Siemens’ worldwide leadership in providing clinical diagnostic solutions for hospital and reference laboratories, specialty laboratories and point-of-care settings (including clinics and physician offices) to help enable diagnostics development.

“Companion diagnostics are an important enabler of targeted therapies for patients,” said John Hubbard, Senior Vice President and Worldwide Head of Development Operations at Pfizer. “This agreement with Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics is another example of Pfizer’s commitment to develop new precision medicines to address unmet clinical needs.”

Companion diagnostic tests are clinical tests linked to a specific drug or therapy intended to assist physicians in making more informed and personalized treatment decisions for their patients. When used in the drug development process, companion diagnostics may help pharmaceutical companies improve patient selection and treatment monitoring, determine the preferred therapy dosing for patients, and establish a protocol to help maximize the treatment benefit for patients.

“Our relationship with Pfizer marks a major milestone in Siemens’ personalized medicine strategy,” commented Dr. Trevor Hawkins, Senior Vice President, Strategy & Innovations, Diagnostics Division, Siemens Healthcare. “We look forward to collaborating with Pfizer to realize the goal of advancing innovative solutions that change the way patient care is delivered and, together, shape the future of diagnostic medicine.”

The Siemens Clinical Laboratory (SCL), a “high-complexity”, cutting-edge testing laboratory focused on advancing personalized medicine, will develop the companion diagnostic tests under the master agreement.

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world’s largest suppliers to the healthcare industry and a trendsetter in medical imaging, laboratory diagnostics, medical information technology and hearing aids. Siemens offers its customers products and solutions for the entire range of patient care from a single source – from prevention and early detection to diagnosis, and on to treatment and aftercare. By optimizing clinical workflows for the most common diseases, Siemens also makes healthcare faster, better and more cost-effective. Siemens Healthcare employs some 52,000 employees worldwide and operates around the world. In fiscal year 2013 (to September 30), the Sector posted revenue of 13.6 billion euros and profit of 2.0 billion euros. For further information please visit: http://www.siemens.com/healthcare

Press release from Siemens Healthcare, 16/12/2013 –  Reference Number: H201312014e

How to choose the right terminological resource

Sans titre 1Terminology includes terms (words, abbreviations and phrases) that have a specific meaning in a specialized language. The process of looking up, storing and managing terms is called terminology management. Effective terminology management can save you lots of time. It is believed that 40% of translation time is spent in terminology research (see article). Systematic terminology management guarantees the consistency of translations making sure that each time the same translation is provided for a term.

While managing your terminology can definitely help speed up the translation process and deliver consistent translations of great quality, there will always be terms you need to look up. The world is changing and every day tons of new terms and expressions are born. These are called neologisms. Sometimes existing words and phrases receive new meanings.

There are many websites offering term lists or term bases including definitions and/or translations. Below are a couple of web sites listing a large number of links to terminological resources. What none of them do, is telling you how to assess the quality of these resources.

There are at least four criteria a website should fulfill in order to qualify as a credible terminological resource. First of all, it should be authoritative which means the content of it should be authentic to the domain. Its makers are experts in the subject field and they know what they are talking about. The website in which the resource is embedded should have some authority, a serious and professional look. Not just a site with a bunch of advertisements, or the home-page of some vague individual but preferably a governmental site or the site of a well-known multinational.

Secondly, it should be comprehensive meaning that a term base or a site with some 50 terms and little extras is less trustworthy than a resource containing 5.000 terms and extra information in the form of definitions, term variants, synonyms, domain labels, grammatical and pragmatical information, example sentences etc. The term comprehensive is subjective in itself but it helps when you need to compare two or more resources.

A resource should also be user-friendly meaning that if it’s slow, regularly unavailable, difficult to search for information or has a too complex interface, it is not so useful and reliable as a user-friendly resource where you, busy translator, can find all information at your fingertips in a fraction of a second. Preferably, this resource should also have an API so that you can include it in your favourite CAT tool.

Finally, the site of the resource should also be regularly updated. Most sites and databases contain information on the date they were last updated. Usually, this can be found on the bottom of the page. It’s worth checking this when consulting the site in order to assess the validity of the information found.

While there is a vast amount of information on the Web, filtering this information becomes crucial. So make sure you are searching for the right terminology in the right place!

The sites listed here offer a good starting point in your search for terms:

http://wordbook.nl/wordbook.html
http://terminotrad.com/index-e.html
http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries.htm
http://lai.com/thc/glmain.html

Attila Görög
www.attilagorog.com


Attila will be giving webinars with Alexandria in 2014:

Terminology management for translators, 20 Feb, 7:30 PM
Introduction to CAT tools and translation memories, 11 March, 7:30 PM
- Working with CAT tools and translation memories, 13 March, 7:30 PM

Mobile Technology: the missing link between health and social care integration?

By Colin Reid, CEO of TotalMobile Ltd.
It is no secret that health and social care integration is high on the UK Government’s agenda, particularly in regards to looking after older people. Our aging society is forcing local organisations such as councils, NHS trusts, GPs and their Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) to work closer together, and there is a lot of strategic discussion and debate as to how to meet the Government’s directives. Maybe now is the time to take a bottom-up approach to integration and look at the practical ways we can support both sets of frontline workers in the first instance.

Integrate at the point of delivery
Both health professionals and social care workers play a pivotal role in the ever-increasing necessity for out-of-hospital care. Whether they are assessing and recording clinical activities or completing a care plan, both social workers and healthcare professionals need relevant and up-to-date information to ensure those who need support get the right care at the right time.

Despite the digital transformation within the NHS and the emphasis placed on ICT for health and social care integration, mobile working, at this stage, does not necessarily mean mobile technology. Putting the right technology (literally) in the hands of frontline workers and making sure they are better connected for home visits can increase the amount of care for those in need and reduce time spent on ancillary activities including travel, paperwork and data entry.

Mobile working can provide common ground from which to start health and social care integration. For example, a social worker equipped with a mobile device that can access case notes, care plans and assessments will make better decisions on behalf of the person they are supporting, in addition to involving that person in their own care. If the same social worker was also able to access information from the health side, a better picture of the person’s wellbeing can be painted. This creates more informed decision-making and can reduce unnecessary readmissions to hospital.

Read more…
Source: ehealthnews.eu
Visit Totalmobile website: http://www.totalmobile.co.uk

Doctors 2.0™ & You Announces Title – From Europe to the World: Healthcare Social Media and Mobile Health

[Press release from http://www.doctors20.com]

5 – 6 June 2014, Paris, France.
Doctors 2.0™ & You, the inclusive digital health congress announced the title for its 4th edition, taking place on June 5-6, 2014, at the magnificent Cité Internationale Universitaire de Paris. “From Europe to the World: Healthcare Social Media and Mobile Health” Doctors 2.0 & You 2014 will emphasize the wealth of digital health innovation from around the world: Europe, Asia and the Middle East, and of course, North America. Doctors 2.0 & You is currently accepting online applications for new speakers, start-up contestants, media and supporting partners, sponsors.

Doctors 2.0 & You, is geared to people from all of healthcare and from around the world, whether annual participants who will enjoy all the new material, or first time attendees. According to conference founder Denise Silber: “Doctors 2.0 & You is about people. Innovation comes from patients, from physicians, from out of the box thinkers at start-ups and structured organizations wherever they may be. Each edition of the conference covers very new ground, on how Social Media and Mobile Apps help get results for patients.”

The quote “Illness happens, but dreams still prevail!” above is from 2014 keynote, Jamie Tripp Utitus, a Multiple Sclerosis (MS) survivor, thriver and international MS blogger. Jamie is the author of a children’s book about a young girl whose mother gives birth while almost simultaneously being diagnosed with MS. Jamie will be signing copies of her book Zoe Bowie and the Meatball, MS Blues… at the conference. As Jamie says: “MS led me to blogging, friends all over the world, 2 books, and now Paris, for the Doctors 2.0 & You. Illness happens, but dreams still prevail!”

According to Dr. Berci Mesko, Doctors 2.0 & You Ambassador and Keynote speaker: “In 2014, we will get to a point where everybody understands the importance of social media in medicine and healthcare, so we have to focus on the meaningful and practical uses of it with evidence. Therefore, the next edition of Doctors 2.0 and You will be crucial!”

Dr. Mesko will also host a MasterClass at Doctors 2.0 & You on “Master skills in tracking social media”. Dr. Mesko has recently published the book Social Media in Clinical Practice.

Amongst the novelties for the 4th edition, both authors, Jamie and Berci will be signing their books on site.

2014 Topics will include: Quantified Self and Connected Objects, Serious Games, Social Media Impact on Medical Congresses, Quality of Mobile Health, Health and Medical Uses of Facebook, Evaluation of Online Communities, Patient Blogging, Professional Blogging, eReputation and Hospital strategy, Pharmacovigilance and Social Media, Best iPad apps for Physicians, Government experience with Social Media, Pharma Digital Strategy, Data Privacy.

Participants at the two-day event will be offered a selection of 20+ parallel sessions and the plenary. They will also network with attendees, speakers and exhibitors including start-up contestants, poster presenters and demonstrators. According to Audun Utengen and Tom Lee of Symplur who audited the 2013 #doctors20 hashtag results, “Doctors 2.0 & You was the most successful of this category in Europe with nearly 8000 tweets in two days, expressed in 15 languages. And we expect the growth to continue in 2014.”

Doctors 2.0™ & You partners with Stanford Medicine X conference, founded by Dr. Larry Chu of Stanford Medical School, who will be present with members of his Medicine X team. As Dr. Chu indicates, “The patient-centered scope of both of our conferences is what binds us together as kindred spirits. I truly believe that what Denise Silber is doing in Europe with Doctors 2.0 & You is important work and I’m proud to support her mission of bringing a patient-centered voice to ICT in healthcare. I will be at Doctors 2.0 & You in June, 2014!”

Round the clock live Tweeting in multiple languages will be visualized throughout the event. The conference will open its doors at 10 AM on Thursday June 5, 2014 and close at 5 PM on Friday June 6, 2013. 450 international participants are expected. Patients should contact the organizers for free seats, space permitting, on a first come, first served basis.

The participation of attendees from all of healthcare and from around the world makes for a most unique networking experience.

Early Bird rates run until December 20, 2013.

For further information, please visit:
http://www.doctors20.com

About Doctors 2.0™ & You
Now in its fourth edition, Doctors 2.0™ & You is the first international conference of its kind to examine how doctors and patients are using social media, applications and web 2.0 tools to work with peers, governments, industry and payers. The conference draws on the expertise of physicians, patient communities, online and mobile tool providers, hospitals, insurers, pharmaceutical companies and governments to help address the role of new technology in healthcare from both the doctor and patient perspective.

About Basil Strategies
Basil Strategies, established in Paris in 2001, is both a digital health communications agency and organizer of events and training. Denise Silber, the founder and President of Basil Strategies in Paris, is a member of the International Conference Advisory Board that organizes the Doctors 2.0 and You congress with the help of the Doctors 2.0 & You International Advisory Board. Silber, who was named to the Legion of Honor, France’s highest civil decoration, is a recognized eHealth, health 2.0 and social media expert in the US and Europe.

TriKonf 2013: Thank you very much! Announcing TriKonf 2015

Trikonf 2013 was held on October 18th to 20th, 2013, in Freiburg im Breisgau, capital of the Black Forest in Southern Germany, in the impressive and gorgeous setting of the Historic Merchants Hall, right in the heart of the old city centre.

Thank you everyone for contributing to make this first TriKonf a success! It was a fabulous high-flying, rich yet relaxed weekend of trilingual networking, training and learning. We had a blast organizing this event and hope it was your case attending it too!

Thank you to the 2013 speakers for their dedication and hard work, thank you to the 2013 sponsors (Kilgray Translation Technologies, SDL Language Technologies, Wordfast) and the supporting associations (ASTTI, BDÜ, SFT, ITI, FIT Europe, DVÜD and UNIVERSITAS Austria) for their support – and thank you to all delegates!

Pictures of the 2013 conference are now available! Visit the 2013 Media & Photos on the TriKonf website page to check them out!


See you at the next TriKonf in 2015 – same city, same venue!
TriKonf 2015 (#trikonf15) – 9- 11 October 2015

Associations Roundtable - left to right: ABRATES, DVÜD, ASTTI, BDÜ, SFT, ITI

TriKonf 2013: Associations Roundtable – left to right: ABRATES, DVÜD, ASTTI, BDÜ, SFT, ITI

Keynote speech by Jost Zetzsche

TriKonf 2013: Keynote speech by Jost Zetzsche

Keynote: Prof. Philipp Koehn

TriKonf 2013: Keynote speech by Prof. Philipp Koehn (finalist, EPO’s European Inventor Award 2013, one of the fathers of the MOSES engine)

TriKonf 2013: Alessandra Martelli giving sweets away to illustrate her workshop on transcreation

TriKonf 2013: Alessandra Martelli giving away sweets during her workshop on transcreation

Some speakers from TriKonf 2013: Rebecca Petras (Translators without Borders), Yves Champollion (Creator of Wordfast), Paul Filkin (SDL Language Technologies), Stefan Gentz (Owner of TRACOM)

Some speakers from TriKonf 2013: Rebecca Petras (Translators without Borders), Yves Champollion (Creator of Wordfast), Paul Filkin (SDL Language Technologies), Stefan Gentz (Owner of TRACOM) – thank you Stefan Gentz for contributing to the photos!

Roundtable on Machine Translation - left to right: Jost Zetzsche, Siegfried Armbruster, Emmanuel Planas, Prof. Philipp Koehn

Trikonf 2013 – Roundtable on Machine Translation (left to right: Jost Zetzsche, Siegfried Armbruster, Emmanuel Planas, Prof. Philipp Koehn)

Jerzy Czopik's workshop on quality insurance in translation

Jerzy Czopik’s workshop on quality insurance in translation

New Web portal for drug discovery

MP900316779[Press release from GRANATUM - www.granatum.org]

Researchers can now use the GRANATUM web portal to socially interact and cooperate, build and share hypotheses, search databases, design and execute in-silico experiments to screen potential chemoprevention drugs ahead of in-vitro and in-vivo test. It is ready to connect biomedical researchers and provide access to information about cancer research and established pharmaceutical agents from 83 global data sources in an integrated, semantically interlinked manner.

The European GRANATUM project started two years ago. Mission: to build a collaboration platform for biomedical researchers in the field of cancer drug research. Version 1.0 of this web portal is now available at www.granatum.org. It provides access to the globally available biomedical knowledge and data resources that the scientists need to prepare complex experiments to identify novel agents for cancer prevention and to design experimental studies. This will accelerate research and reduce its costs.

Faster research results
Scientists from universities, research institutes and pharmaceutical companies are invited to use the GRANATUM Platform to share their knowledge and cooperatively generate expertise and experimental data, thus producing research results faster. Based on the GRANATUM Biomedical Semantic Model researchers can semantically annotate, manage and access biomedical resources, e.g. public databases, digital libraries and archives, online communities and discussions.

A Scientific Workflow Management System for biomedical experts provides a set of advanced tools to create, update, store, and share in-silico modeling experiments for the discovery of new chemopreventive agents.

Connecting socially
“The GRANATUM Portal will socially connect biomedical research across national boundaries, ease scientific exchange and, for the first time, allow collaboration in formulating hypotheses and testing potential drugs,” explains Prof. Wolfgang Prinz, the coordinator of the GRANATUM project and deputy director of the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology FIT.

The GRANATUM Portal is based on the BSCW Shared Workspace System developed by Fraunhofer FIT and OrbiTeam Software GmbH. It was designed and built in the GRANATUM project as “A Social Collaborative Working Space Semantically Interlinking Biomedical Researchers, Knowledge And Data For The Design And Execution Of In-Silico Models And Experiments In Cancer Chemoprevention”, partially funded by the European Commission as part of the FP7 framework.

The GRANATUM consortium includes seven partners: National University of Ireland Galway (NUIG-DERI), Cybion Srl. (Italy), Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (Greece), University of Cyprus (UCY/CBC and UCY/CS), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), UBITECH (Greece), and Fraunhofer FIT acting as project coordinator.

For further information, please visit:
http://www.granatum.org

TriKonf: Regular pricing expires today – one week left to register

Freiburg Kaufhaus Erker

von Andreas Praefcke (Eigenes Werk) [GFDL oder CC-BY-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Dear colleagues,

The regular pricing for the TriKonf ends tonight at midnight (Central European Time) – from tomorrow on, the conference fee will be 30 € more expensive – until next Friday at noon (CET) when registration closes.

So, if you’re planning to attend the conference and have not registered yet, today is a good day to do so!

Registration for dinner is also open until Friday next week – no dinenr booking can be accepted beyond this point.

Register now and join us in Freiburg for the #trikonf13!
trikonf.com/registration

Cheers!
The TriKonf team