What do translators need?

Blank notepad over laptop and coffee cupThe Alexandria Project is now in its second year of existence and we would like to have a better understanding of what professional translators and interpreters need/wish in terms of resources and continuous education (aka CPD – continuous professional development).
We created a short survey – and we need your help! Your answer will help us achieve this and will allow us to constantly refine and improve Alexandria by offering resources and CPD that match your needs and expectations.
This survey is completely anonymous and will take just a few minutes to fill – click here to view it

Thank you very much for your time!

Resources for translators: DGT TM AutoSuggest Dictionaries

Flag of european unionSince 2004 the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Translation has made its multilingual Translation Memory for the Acquis Communautaire (DGT TM) publicly accessible in order to foster the European Commission’s general effort to support multilingualism, language diversity and the re-use of Commission information.

The Acquis Communautaire is the entire body of European legislation, comprising all the treaties, regulations and directives adopted by the European Union (EU). Since each new country joining the EU is required to accept the whole Acquis Communautaire, this body of legislation has been translated into 23 official languages. As a result, the Acquis now exists as parallel texts in the following 23 languages: Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, German, Greek, Finnish, French, Irish, Hungarian, Italian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Maltese, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Slovene, Spanish and Swedish. For Irish, there is very little data since the Acquis is not translated on a regular basis.

The Alexandria team created (is still creating) AutoSuggest dictionaries from the TMs created from this materials (click here for more information). Creating these takes hours, if not days of work and of blocking a computer… but not anymore, we are serving them to you on a plate!

Visit the Translation Resource Center on Alexandria for more information, to view the language pairs available and download DGT AutoSuggest Dictionaries (more language pairs will be added over time).

Good luck and enjoy the Dictionaries!

“Translation Resources” area now open on Alexandria – first resources added

Blank notepad over laptop and coffee cupThe “Translation resources” area is now open in the brandnew Alexandria Library, with the first two sections: Translation memories and glossaries.
You can now download free translation memories and free glossaries – for now there are only glossaries extracted from the WHO Health Environment Lexicon and translation memories extracted from the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) TM – all of them available for German, French and English.

Links:

Translation Resources Area
WHO Glossaries to download (extracted from the WHO Health Environment Lexicon)
Translation Memories landing page
ECDC Translation memories to download

If you want to contribute and help cleaning ECDC or WHO translation memories/glossaries for your language pair(s), just shoot us an email (info[at]alexandria-library.com). It would be great to be able to offer these free resources in more language pairs! A great way to contribute to the project (many colleagues are already contributing right now) and you’d get your own contributor page – another online profile for you to customize at will to promote your services.

Over time, more languages and more TMs and glossaries will be added and made available. Some will remain free while others will be for sale. If you have glossaries and/or TMs you want to share or sell, feel free to contact us. We’ll sell or distribute them for you. (You first need to make sure that the materials belong to you, that they are not copyright-protected or don’t contain confidential information from your clients).

For any question, enquiry, information, do not hesitate to contact us!

The Alexandria Library has moved!

1523019_716007601766834_324051246_oWe’re very happy to announce the release of the latest version of the Alexandria Library – we’ve been very busy with it these past couple weeks! Bigger, better, user-friendlier, and all placeholder are there for the future resource center we envisionned upon creating the platform.

The new website is available at alexandria-translation-resources.com – Still in beta, still a few glitches (particularly with Internet Explorer) but we’re working on them (and any feedback is welcome). In the meantime, the current website (alexandria-library.com) will remain as it is for a few more days before closing and moving to the new website too, including the domain name alexandria-library.com. So no worries, you’ll be able to access Alexandria with the usual URL http://www.alexandria-library.com

Regarding blog subscriptions (those of you who get email notifications whenever a new post is posted on the Alexandria blog), we’ll take you with us on the new website but the process is not complete until you hit “Subscribe” on the new blog if you wish to keep receiving notifications: alexandria-translation-resources.com/blog/

Please try and avoid posting a new comment here, instead please post your comment directly in the new blog: all articles are there, up and running.

Thank you for your patience and support – and do not hesitate to contact us if you have any question, feedback or trouble accessing the new platform.

Warm regards,

The GxP Team

Standing Out, or the Art of Becoming an Outstanding Translator

By Andrew Morris, Morristraduction
This article was originally posted on the Alexandria Project’s blog

Gummy Bear Stepping out of LineThere’s a fair amount of victim culture in our little world of translation, between the evil ghost of Machine Tourism hovering in the wings, the rapacious agencies, (oh and don’t get me started on the Big Guys), the constant lament about the crowded market place, and the ever-present refrain about how fees are being driven down.

My goodness, it’s carnage out there. So much so that it’s possible to throw your hands up and say “With things that bad, what can a translator possibly do to survive?” If you’re that way inclined, that is.

But I’m not that way inclined. And my answer to the question is simple. “Everything”.

When I started out I’d never heard of multi-language vendors, I wasn’t familiar with the term machine translation, and I certainly knew nothing about the lurking monsters and the clouds hanging over the industry, if some of the prophets of doom are to believed. I simply began by working on what I had to do, creating my own space, in a tiny village in rural France, and doing it as well as I could, and the rest gradually fell into place. And it’s not over yet…. I’m just getting into my stride.

The fact is that your life as a translator is in your hands, not anyone else’s and certainly not “the industry’s”. Realising this is about making the shift from victim to agent, from someone at the mercy of “market forces” to someone who decides that from now on, they are in control, and they will call the shots. It’s about understanding that your own professional world, with all its ups and downs, is nothing but your own creation.

Always assuming, of course, that you’re actually good at what you do, and that you haven’t missed your real vocation, somewhere along your journey, which was to become a trapeze artist, a concert cellist or a master baker of cupcakes.

So rather than trying to change the whole world, if you work on your own little patch of it and become the best translator you can be, showing yourself in the best possible light, and pushing yourself to grow, you will stand out. And that’s a promise. Not only that, you will thrive and watch your professional life begin to develop in ways you never even imagined…

How am I so sure of this? Because it’s exactly what happened to me in the five years since I first became a translator. And I’ve seen it mirrored in countless other colleagues since.

Now don’t get me wrong. Getting ahead and standing out from the crowd doesn’t mean trampling on other people. There’s room for everyone, all standing out from each other. It simply means finding your unique niche and letting your own individuality shine through.

So forget about who else is out there and what they’re up to: just work on yourself as a professional practitioner and the rest will follow. When your own vision is stronger than the other hectoring, doubting or complaining voices around, and when you do what inspires you, in a way that inspires you (or, as someone once said, ‘You tap-dance to work’), then you will soon see that people can’t wait to get what you have.

Of course along the way there will be challenges, obstacles and experiences that may initially appear as mistakes or even failures, but are in fact the most valuable feedback you can have. It’s part of the game. Who wants an easy life anyway?

My forthcoming webinar here on the Alexandria Project will identify 50 of the many practical and easily applicable ways in which you can stand out just by changing your own professional practice as a translator. But it starts with a shift in mindset, which is the basis for all that follows. We will begin by examining your values and deciding what you want, before going on to explore the best ways to brand and showcase your unique contribution, to attracting (and keeping) clients, the organisation of your working life and finally professional development and continued learning, but all connected to your fundamental understanding of yourself, your unique contribution to the world of translation and your vision.

Believe me, building a successful business takes enterprise and hard work, but it’s not rocket science. The secrets of success are in your hands. And in your mind. And the fact that you’ve read this far already shows you have the enthusiasm, commitment, drive and energy to start exploring ways of doing so, perhaps not for the first time. This commitment is something I share, and I’m looking forward to working with you towards making your mark. Join me on April 2nd and watch those opportunities unfold.

Andrew’s webinar: “50 ways to stand out as a translator” – April 2nd, 2014, 120 minutes (English).
For more information and to register: click here


AAndrew Morrisbout Andrew 
Andrew Morris has always been captivated by languages and the mysterious secret worlds they open up. This led him initially to a degree in modern languages at Oxford followed by a long career in language teaching and teacher training. But when in 2009 a series of chance(?) life events dictated it was time for a major change, a lightbulb flashed in his head… ‘Why not translation?’
It was a leap of faith… apart from a fascinating correspondence course for translators, his CV as a translator on the first day of his new life was a totally blank sheet. But with lots of hard work, some luck, a dollop of inspiration, a drop or two of perspiration and a hitherto undiscovered entrepreneurial spirit, things slowly began to fall into place. Now, fewer than five years later, he heads Morristraduction, a thriving boutique agency, working both with other agencies and major direct clients with a primary focus on culture and travel, and outsourcing to a regular team of 20 hand-picked colleagues. Business has grown by 475% in that time and the future looks bright…
But we never leave the past entirely behind, and Andrew’s constant search for new experience along with his background as a teacher and trainer have led him to reconnect with his training skills, offering webinars with the Alexandria Project as well as tailored one-to-one Skype coaching to translators at various levels of their careers…

Webinare zum Thema medizinische Übersetzung (auf Deutsch) mit BDÜ-Rabatt

The respiratory system, eps10Wir möchten Sie heute auf eine Serie von Webinaren zum Thema Medizinische Übersetzung auf Alexandria aufmerksam machen,- die Sie vielleicht interessieren könnten:

Grundlagen für medizinische Übersetzer 1: Medizinische Terminologie – Einführung (27.02.2014)
– Grundlagen für medizinische Übersetzer 2: EMA-Templates (27.03.2014)
– Grundlagen für medizinische Übersetzer 3: Anatomie/Physiologie – Herz-Kreislaufsystem (24.04.2014)
– Grundlagen für medizinische Übersetzer 4: Anatomie/Physiologie – Atmung/Lunge (22.05.2014)
– Grundlagen für medizinische Übersetzer 5: Textarten – Gebrauchs- und Fachinformation (PIL & SmPC) (26.06.2014)
– Grundlagen für medizinische Übersetzer 6: Anatomie/Physiologie – Skelett/Bewegungsapparat (25.09.2014)
– Grundlagen für medizinische Übersetzer 7: Medizintechnik – Blutdruck/EKG/Herzkatheter (30.10.2014)
– Grundlagen für medizinische Übersetzer 8: Medizintechnik – Orthopädische Implantate, Schrauben/Platten/Stangen usw. (27.11.2014)
– Grundlagen für medizinische Übersetzer 9: Anatomie/Physiologie – Nervensystem (11.12.2014)

Sie müssen sich nicht für die ganze Serie anmelden – gerne können Sie sich auch für einzelne Webinare anmelden.

BDÜ-Mitglieder kriegen einen Rabatt auf jedes Webinar: bitte kontaktieren Sie uns, wenn Sie Interesse haben (alternativ finden Sie alle Informationen darüber in MeinBDÜ, in der Konferenz “Webinare”).

Wir freuen uns auf Ihre Teilnahme!

The new Alexandria is here!

© Kurhan - Fotolia.comAfter weeks of planning and 3 days of intensive redesigning and moving, the new Alexandria is finally here!

Let us give you a quick overview of what’s changed and a tour of the new website:

- After almost a year running on Instant Presenter, we moved the webinar platform to Citrix’ GoToWebinar – which most of you know
– The new website integrates an actual and interactive Calendar
- The Homepage displays a selection of featured courses, followed by a simple chronological list of all upcoming courses
– More visibility for the Video Shelf in the top menu
– A new area for Conferences (not quite complete yet, we’re working on it!)
– An All Webinars page displaying a clear, chronological list of alle upcoming webinars, with dates and option to register directly
– An integrated Alexandria blog (all past webinars from the old website are archived there as regular posts)
– The integration of the registration system directly on each course page, along with more payment options (including VAT for those of you based in Germany)

We also added some new e-mail addresses to keep things organized:
– for support/technical issues: support@alexandria-library.com
– to subscribe to the Alexandria newsletter: subscribe@alexandria-library.com
– for general enquiries or applications: info@alexandria-library.com

The new website is still in beta-phase, so there may be a few glitches here and there. Your ideas and suggestions are more than welcome, feel free to let us know! (simply use the comment field below)

In the meantime, we are actively working on the 2014 schedule and programme – you’ll love it!

Thank you all for your patience during the move and the redesign and your fidelity to the Alexandria Library!
Anne and the Alexandria Team